OPERATING ENGINEERS LOCAL 3
JOURNEYMAN AND APPRENTICE TRAINING CENTER

Character Building

Graduates actively participate in their communities by remaining strong Union members and becoming politically active in support of working families

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OPERATING ENGINEERS LOCAL 3
JOURNEYMAN AND APPRENTICE TRAINING CENTER

Community Building

Working with the community to preserve a way of life

Get details

OPERATING ENGINEERS LOCAL 3
JOURNEYMAN AND APPRENTICE TRAINING CENTER

Preservation

Restoring habitat equal to the size of the training site with native trees and plants

Get details

OPERATING ENGINEERS LOCAL 3
JOURNEYMAN AND APPRENTICE TRAINING CENTER

Character Building

Graduates actively participate in their communities by remaining strong Union members and becoming politically active in support of working families

Get details

OPERATING ENGINEERS LOCAL 3
JOURNEYMAN AND APPRENTICE TRAINING CENTER

Community Building

Working with the community to preserve a way of life

Get details

OPERATING ENGINEERS LOCAL 3
JOURNEYMAN AND APPRENTICE TRAINING CENTER

Preservation

Restoring habitat equal to the size of the training site with native trees and plants

Get details

OPERATING ENGINEERS LOCAL 3
JOURNEYMAN AND APPRENTICE TRAINING CENTER

Character Building

Graduates actively participate in their communities

Get details

OPERATING ENGINEERS LOCAL 3
JOURNEYMAN AND APPRENTICE TRAINING CENTER

Community Building

Working with the community to preserve a way of life

Get details

OPERATING ENGINEERS LOCAL 3
JOURNEYMAN AND APPRENTICE TRAINING CENTER

Preservation

Restoring habitat equal to the size of the training site with native trees and plants

Get details

OUR MISSION

To attract and train the best and brightest talent available to meet the industry’s needs for today and for the future, and to provide training for our skilled journey workers through continuing education.

A MEMBER OF THE COMMUNITY SINCE THE 1960’S

In 1969, after a decade of growth and looking toward the future, Operating Engineers Local 3 realized their dream of a facility to train future operating engineers. Years of planning and hard work throughout the decade culminated in the opening of the Operating Engineers Local 3 Journeyman and Apprentice Training Center (OE3 JATC) in Rancho Murieta, California, 20 miles southeast of downtown Sacramento.

On November 15, 1969, 1,400 people attended the dedication of the new facility, watching as a team of skydivers, led by Operating Engineers Paul Schissler and Pete Kalthoff, members of the amazing Golden State Skydiving Team, entertain them. As reported in the Engineers News, “Not since the bloody forays of bandit chieftain Joaquin Murieta whose name still rings out on these rolling hills and the swish-swish of a thousand gold pans in the Consumes River had this small community witnessed such a big event.”

OUR STORY

Since its first training classes in 1969, the OE3 JATC has developed into one of the country’s most prestigious training centers. The vast majority of northern California’s highly skilled apprentice and journey-level operating engineers have attended classes at the training center. Trained operating engineers enter the work force with new and improved skills, increased opportunity for job advancement, and a job they can count on for years to come. OE3 JATC, where apprentices and journeymen train for free!

Business Manager Al Clem and California Governor Ronald Reagen at the Rancho Murieta Training Center in 1973

THE PRESENT

RANCHO MURIETA TRAINING CENTER

For almost 50 years, the OE3 JATC has developed into an 11-½-acre campus and 40-acre equipment training area where hands-on training is conducted. The campus facilities are scattered across the campus area and include dormitories, cafeteria, classrooms, and various other facilities necessary to run the training center. The classrooms include both a traditional classroom setting and hands on classrooms where operating engineers learn heavy equipment maintenance and repair. The 40-acre equipment training area allows apprentice and journey-level operating engineers to train on state-of-art equipment, to learn new technologies and master techniques and skills to take back into the workforce.

The existing campus has developed into one of the country’s largest and most prestigious construction union training centers.  Approximately 100 students complete their apprenticeship training each year. In addition, approximately 250 journey-level students attend upgrade training each year at the OE3 JATC. The current facilities have allowed thousands of operating engineers to learn new or expand on existing skills that contribute to construction projects around the region. Operating Engineers Local 3 is now looking to continue this 50-year tradition of supplying the regions workforce with a new state-of-the-art training center.

Operators shown here at the current location – 14738 Cantova Way, Sloughhouse CA 95683

TESTIMONIALS

The OE3 team have been wonderful to work with. They have upgraded and modernized the water system so our cattle have a year around water supply. If we need to move a chute, or get a water truck or jump a pickup with a dead battery, someone is there to help us.

We look forward to a long term relationship with the Operating Engineers.

5-Star Land and Livestock

What is an Operating Engineer

Operating Engineers develop and maintain the country’s infrastructure by building bridges, dams and roadways. From the Middle Ages to Modern Times, Apprenticeships have been instrumental in training the next generation of skilled craftsmen.

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THE FUTURE

PILLIKEN RANCH

The Pilliken Ranch is a 1,500 acre property with a long history of open space, cattle grazing, and mining. OE3 purchased the property in 2013 with the intent of relocating the existing OE3 JATC to a portion of this property. In the last three years OE3 has invested time and money into designing a new OE3 JATC that will preserve current land uses while allowing OE3 to supply their membership with free education that provides the regional construction sector the most qualified operating engineers in the industry.

Photography courtesy of Golden Bay Media

Local horses

PRESERVING TRADITIONAL LAND USES

Cattle grazing will continue on approximately 1,400 acres of the property supplying organic grass feed beef.

LOCAL IMPROVEMENTS

Local infrastructure improvements that include paved roads into the training center and appropriate signage will be seen as a result of the new site improvements.

PROTECTING ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES

Approximately 1,050 acres will be permanently preserved by a conservation easement.

PROVIDING A SKILLED WORKFORCE

A state-of-the-art facility with the features and space necessary to train the operating engineers of the future.

PRESERVATION

TO BE GOOD STEWARDS OF THE LAND AND PRESERVE THE ECOSYSTEM

Approximately 1,050 acres on the Pilliken Ranch will be permanently preserved.  On-site preservation will occur in two locations: (1) The eastern portion of the site will be used to mitigate project-related biological impacts. (2) The western portion of the site will be permitted as a mitigation bank managed under the South Sacramento Habitat Conservation Plan. To maximize habitat values, OE3 proposes to create improved habitat.

Special-status species and habitats identified to either be present or have the potential to occur within these two on-site preservation areas include:

Five potentially sensitive biological communities
including:

Seasonal Wetlands

Seasonal Swale

Vernal Pool

Stock Pond

Intermittent Stream

Seasonal Wetland, Seasonal Swale, Vernal Pool, Stock Pond, and Intermittent Stream

Ten special-status plant species that have moderate or high potential to occur or are present in the project area, including:

Hogwallow Starfish

Legenere

Sanford’s Arrowhead

Dwarf Downingia

Tuolumne Button-Celery

Boggs Lake Hedge-Hyssop

Ahart’s Dwarf Rush

Pincushion Navarretia

Slender Orcutt Grass

Sacramento Orcutt grass

Hogwallow Starfish, Legenere, Sanford’s Arrowhead, Dwarf Downingia, Tuolumne Button-Celery, Boggs Lake Hedge-Hyssop, Ahart’s Dwarf Rush, Pincushion Navarretia, Slender Orcutt Grass, and Sacramento Orcutt grass

Twelve (12) special-status wildlife species that may breed, nest, roost, or forage within the project area including

Swainson’s Hawk

Northern Harrier

Nuttall’s Woodpecker

Loggerhead Shrike

Yellow Billed Magpie

Oak Titmouse

Grasshopper Sparrow

Vernal Pool Fairy Shrimp

Vernal Pool Tadpole Shrimp

California Linderiella

Midvalley Fairy Shrimp

Blennosperma Vernal Pool Andrenid Bee

Swainson’s hawk, northern harrier, Nuttall’s woodpecker, loggerhead shrike, yellow-billed magpie, oak titmouse, grasshopper sparrow, vernal pool fairy shrimp, vernal pool tadpole shrimp, California linderiella, midvalley fairy shrimp, and blennosperma vernal pool andrenid bee.

WE DO THIS BY

Following set guidelines and rules as detailed below

CREATING BUFFER ZONES

CREATING A BUFFER ZONE
TO BLOCK OUT NOISE AND VISIBILITY
FOR THE PUBLIC AND LOCAL RESIDENTS

PROTECTING OPEN SPACE

PROTECTING OPEN SPACE
TO SUPPORT THE HABITAT
OF ENDANGERED PLANTS AND ANIMALS

RESTORING HABITAT

Equal to the size
of the training site
with native trees and plants

SUPPORTING FREE-RANGE GRAZING

Promotes deep root systems
that aerate the soil to
support native plants and grasses

WE DO THIS BY

Following set guidelines and rules as detailed below

CREATING BUFFER ZONES

CREATING A BUFFER ZONE
TO BLOCK OUT NOISE AND VISIBILITY
FOR THE PUBLIC AND LOCAL RESIDENTS

PROTECTING OPEN SPACE

PROTECTING OPEN SPACE
TO SUPPORT THE HABITAT
OF ENDANGERED PLANTS AND ANIMALS

RESTORING HABITAT

Equal to the size
of the training site
with native trees and plants

SUPPORTING FREE-RANGE GRAZING

Promotes deep root systems
that aerate the soil to
support native plants and grasses

THE PROJECT

THE PROJECT WILL BE COMPLETED IN STAGES AS DESCRIBED BELOW

The OE3 training center will be located on approximately 450 acres within the 1,500 project site.  Approximately 15 of the 450 acres will be used for the campus and associated facilities. The campus uses will be the same as those that currently occur at the training center in Rancho Murieta. Approximately 435 of the 450 acres will allow for expanded equipment movement and field instruction currently unavailable at the existing training center. Only 80 acres will be subject to field training activities at a time, with the remainder fallow for cattle grazing on a rotational basis.

TWO-PHASED APPROACH

OE3 is proposing to develop the OE3 Training Center and Open Space Preservation Project on the Pilliken Ranch. 

The project consists of two primary elements:

Phase 1 – development of a state-of-the-art training campus and expansion of an existing field instruction facility for journeyman and apprentice operating engineers and

Phase 2 – permanent preservation of approximately 1,050 acres of open space containing federally and state-protected species and habitat.

The new campus and field instruction facility will replace an existing OE3 training center in Rancho Murieta.

PROJECT DOCUMENTATION

TRI-FOLD BROCHURE

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Why is the project referred to as a training center and open space preservation?

The Piliken Ranch property is approximately 1,500 acres. Campus facilities and field instruction will use approximately 450 of the 1,500 acres. Approximately 15 acres will be permanently used for campus facilities including classrooms, dormitories, cafeteria, lounge/recreation area, maintenance and repair facilities, and administrative offices. The remaining 435 acres will be used for field instruction and training. Only approximately 80 acres will be subject to field training at a time with the remaining 355 acres will fallow for cattle grazing. The 1,050 acres not used for field instruction will be permanently preserved. Preservation areas will include cattle grazing and open space habitat containing federally and state protected species.

What is typical project traffic?

Project traffic is limited to OE3 employees (i.e. instructors), students, and service providers. The majority of the student population will arrive on a Sunday afternoon and depart on a Friday or Saturday afternoon at the conclusion of a 2-week or 8-week training class. A typical training class has 70 students. Student ingress/egress is prohibited while attending training classes.

What entrance will be used to access the training center?

OE3 employees, students, and services providers will enter/exit the site via a private gated driveway on Meiss Road. Project related traffic will be prohibited from using the gated entrance on Apple Road. The Apple Road entrance is currently, and will continue to, only used for cattle grazing and open space environmental monitoring related vehicles.

During what hours will field instruction occur?

Field instruction only occurs during daylight hours. Typically field instruction is between 7:30am and 4:00pm, Monday through Friday with occasional Saturday training sessions.

How will the training center be secured?

The Pilliken Ranch property is fenced and all entrances are gated. In addition, uniformed security is onsite at night.

Who is a typical operating engineer student?

Operating engineers are skilled professionals that perform a variety of construction and equipment related jobs in the workforce. Individuals seeking to become an operating engineer or current operating engineers looking to expand their skills attend classes at the training center. These students are typically between the ages of 20 and 30 years old.

Will I be able to see the training center?

Field instruction has been occurring onsite for the last several years. The only visible aspect of training activities are the tops of cranes located in the middle of the property. Future field instruction will maintain approximately ½ mile buffer from the closest residence and over a mile for a majority of the surrounding residences. The campus has been positioned in a portion of the property to eliminate potential views from surrounding residences and roadways.

OE3 Joint Apprentice Training Center (JATC)

14738 Cantova Way
Sloughhouse, CA 94683
Phone: (916) 354-2029

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